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Weekend Early Start

News/Business. Randi Kaye. The day's top news and events. New.

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CNN

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00:30:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast Cable

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Virtual Ch. 759 (CNN HD)

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mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
1920

PIXEL HEIGHT
1080

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Us 17, New Delhi 7, Turkey 7, Washington 7, India 4, Emily Schmidt 2, Andrew Mccarthy 2, Cnn 2, Usaa 2, Emilie 2, Patgonia 2, Thomas Sargent 1, Emilie Parker 1, Mommy 1, Josephine Gay 1, Lilia 1, Van 1, Randi Kaye 1, Chris Christie 1, Sargent 1,
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  CNN    Weekend Early Start    News/Business. Randi Kaye. The  
   day's top news and events. New.  

    December 23, 2012
    4:00 - 4:30am PST  

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three men from nebraska filled a trailer with toys bound for newtown and drove 1,300 miles through a blizzard to deliver the toys before christmas. they wanted newtown's children to know there is more love in the world than hate. a police officer saved the life of an infant strapped in a run away shopping cart. the officer stopped the cart just before it rolled on to a busy highway. the cart rolled away as the mother was placing another child in the car. thanks so much for starting your morning with us, we have much more ahead on "cnn sunday morning" which starts right now. and good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it's 7:00 on the east coast and 4:00 on the west. thanks so much for starting your morning with us. first, a horrific attack on a young woman is sparking anger in
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the streets of india and demands for change. protesters chanting "we want justice" in new delhi. the 23-year-old is fighting for her life at a hospital after she was beaten and gang raped on a bus last weekend. we are learning a journalist has been killed in a separate protest over another incident. joining me now on the phone from new delhi, karma, what can you tell us about this journalist who died? >> he was a local camera person for video journalist. the state is seeing some unrest over an assault on a woman. they were violent protests earlier. the police firing water canons. we were told today, on this particular day, believed that some of the people try to burn a police van. that's when the police resorted
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it never happened. there are calls for police brutality because firing its gun with a live bullet only in extreme cases. as far as dehli is concerned, it is very, very voltile now. around india, which is the main monument in new delhi. there were crowds who were gathered and making a concentrated effort to clear that area. we've suddenly seen activity from the police and fire and tear gas shells and also storming now with some of the protesters taking on the police. >> what about this young woman who was attacked. what is her condition at this point? >> her condition has only deterrierated by now because earlier we had a medical bulletin where the doctors said she has been suddenly been put
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on the ventilator, again. her security and she's having problems breathing. yesterday, her condition had improved slightly. right now her condition did improve. make her walk briefly, but her condition has suddenly deteriorated and she's back on ventilator support. >> have there been any arrests on her on this moving bus? >> yes, six people, six people have been arrested and now this is totally getting out of hand as far as protests are concerned. battles between the police and the protesters in new delhi. that's what we're seeing now. >> there was a ban, right, correct, on these police, on these protests, but demonstrators defied the ban and now growing bigger and getting even more violent? >> yes. section 144 laws enforced in and around new delhi, which means
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large crowds cannot assemble in these areas. but that has been defied by the people. people coming out in thousands. right now i can tell you, it is very, very violent. we are seeing fights from both sides now. >> you know, we hear about what happened there and you think of this young woman being attacked and raped on a moving bus. are these types of attacks common or are rape attacks common in india? >> we have seen, yes, we have seen over the last year. if you talk about capital new delhi. this is the capital of india and we are told the numbers are around 600 rapes reported last year. which is an alarming number, but it is a problem because most of it is not reported because the families want to think that the woman should not be exposed.
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they really don't report it. it is a worry. and now certainly could be the tipping point and people have come out in numbers to say, enough is enough. they are strong laws needed. you know when these cases are taken to court when, you know, uncomfortable questions are asked of the victims. all this really now coming to a point where people just want to make themselves heard. >> we certainly see that spilling into the streets there. karma reporting for us from new delhi. thank you very much. meanwhile, back here at home, flags raised to full staff this morning in connecticut, the first time since the shootings occurred there in newtown. meanwhile, we saw the last three funerals for the sandy hook victims. three more little girls were laid to rest, left to right, josephine gay, anna
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marquez-greene and emilie parker. >> today we had a beautiful tribute to emilie and we said our final good-byes today. it was so special to have family together, to sing songs that were emilie's favorites. >> after the holidays, the survivors of the sandy hook shooting will return to school. they'll be in a new building, but it will be filled with all the furniture and artwork from their old school. one new jersey school district plans to have armed police officers in all of their schools starting when classes resume after the holidays. the mayor says he made the decision before the nra made the suggestion on friday. they actually had armed guards in some of the schools already. new jersey governor chris christie on the other hand thinks armed guards in schools aren't the answer to gun violence and that problem.
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to washington now and the negotiations over the fiscal cliff. actually, there really aren't any negotiations now. the president is in hawaii. we're in a bit of a holding pattern as both sides dig in their heels. the middle class and small businesses were the focus during the presidential campaign. but, now, they stand to be the biggest losers as the battle in washington pushes us closer to that cliff. cnn's emily schmidt has more. >> go on. >> reporter: there are people who make overcoming obstacles even those towering 40 vertical feet high look easy. these rock climbers the heart of the climbing center business. >> i think with climbing, you have to trust your partner and you have to know that they're holding your rope. >> reporter: this takes team work which is why she's frustrated of another cliff looming in washington. >> so much uncertainty, not just
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for me as a business owner but for our members and our clientele. >> reporter: with negotiations stalled, she has put plans to expand her business on hold. she's worried because going over the cliff will cost middle class families an estimated $2,000 a year. money people won't have to spend here. >> it's always challenging when you're in a recreational type of environment because that's sometimes the first thing that people consider when they're evaluating their finances and what am i going to spend my money on. >> the fear that we're going to have, we're going to lose our customers and our shoppers and we've been here for ten years. >> a rough few years since the recession. now she says she's terrified we're on the verge of tumbling back in. >> the effects of them not coming up with a plan is going to be devastating and i see a huge, a bigger recession. >> reporter: the prospect of higher taxes next year means
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she's cutting back now. trimming staff for january and february, only buying clothing she's sure will sell. her goal, just to keep her business afloat. >> my biggest fear is that my 7-year-old will never really get a chance to see what i've built. >> reporter: back at the climbing center, lilia said there are lessons that washington negotiators can stand to learn. >> it doesn't mean that you're locked into that move, it doesn't mean you can't try something else. >> reporter: fiscal cliff hanging shouldn't be an option because so much is on the line. emily schmidt, cnn, washington. so, one woman says police offered her family a turkey as an apology for pepper spraying her brother, who has down syndrome. but this family doesn't want a turkey, they want justice and they want a lawsuit and you'll hear from them. this is how mommy learned...
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people around the nation are outraged after hearing that a sheriff's department in california tried to apologize for pepper spraying a man with down syndrome by offering his family a turkey. the family said the sheriff deputy used his pepper spray on
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21-year-old antonio martinez. he was walking down the street and didn't respond to the deputy's commands and then the tep deputy hit him with his baton. the sheriff department captain later apologized to the fwamaam and said the department made a mistake. i talked to the man and his sister and she explained why the family is going to push ahead with a lawsuit. >> if they did it to him, they're going to end up doing it to any guy or any girl they see on the street and they say they look suspicious. that's what they said, he looked suspicious and that's why they proceeded to stop him and he, he didn't do anything wrong. he was just walking from our house to the bakery. and he was just going to work. >> we did get a statement from the san diego county sheriff department and it said that the
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deputy used the pepper spray to prevent possible escape and then explained the use of force saying in part an attempt to traik the deputy into custody, an additional deputy arrived and the struggle continued. the subject was eventually taken into custody. the sheriff department is investigating this incident. but it was, the case was dropped, though, right? there were no charges. >> tuesday he had a citation when we picked him up from the sheriff station. on wednesday they came and apologized and said we revoked the ticket that was given to antonio and they offered us a turkey to apologize. we were like, a turkey is not going to bring peace to our family and comfort that antonio had before this happened to him. >> did they come to your house with a turkey or was that a turkey they would get for you? >> they came to our bakery and
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they said we would like to speak to you and your family about the incident of antonio martinez. and we said, okay, then you can come, but they said we are going to revoke the ticket that was given and they asked us, oh, by the way, what are you going to do for christmas? and we were like, well, we just stay home and try to have a good time. that's when they offered the turkey with all the stuffing. >> what about the deputy involved? the sheriff department wouldn't say if the deputy was reprimanded. do you know and how does this make you feel if he wasn't? >> we are not sure what has happened to him. when the chief came to speak to us, he said he was on a four-day vacation. i'm not sure. and if he doesn't, we want him out of our city. we don't want him there. he did a lot of damage to my
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brother. my brother doesn't want to walk home from our bakery and it's just like a five-minute walk and he doesn't want to walk no where. he wants us to go with him and he, it was funny because we went to the store, i think it was on thursday, and he saw some gloves and he's like, oh, can i get those? because he's afraid to put his hands in his sweater when it's cold. now he wants to use gloves because he doesn't want to -- he doesn't feel safe any more. >> what about the community? how is the community reacting, especially since so many witnessed this. >> well, they're being so supportive. they called us from colorado, like around the united states they've been calling us and we should fight to the end and get justice for my brother. and a lot of witnesses say, if you need me, you just call me. they've been calling us that
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they took my brother to the hospital and he was still in handcuffs, even though knowing that he had down syndrome. >> well, jessica martinez and your brother, antonio, thank you, both, very much for coming on and sharing your story. anton antonio, we wish you well and hope you heal very soon. thank you. and here's how some of you responded on twitter following that interview. a lot of you were reaching out. a lot of you were angry hearing about that they had offered that family a turkey. todd tweeted, wow, that is seriously messed up. time to seek legal action, i'd say. andrea tweeted this, disgusting. the family should get justice for that senseless beating of the down syndrome patient. they should fire this deputy, as he clearly did not get the training for the job to serve and protect. those tweets continue to come in related to that story. shifting gears now, i want you to take a close look at these pictures. tell me, do you recognize him?
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here's a hint, he was a famous 1980s teen heartthrob. i'm talking to him about his new-found career as a travel writer. coming up. first, we want to say good morning to washington, d.c. bright and early there. just 18 minutes past 7:00 a.m. in washington. great shot on the capitol. glad you're with us here on "cnn sunday morning." fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different.
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we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help.
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welcome back, 21 minutes past the hour now. glad you're with us. it's almost the start of the new year and the time when many of us think about our futures and, at least for me, that includes traveling. maybe it does for you, as well. i recently spoke with travel
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writer andrew mccarthy about his experiences. yes, he is the same andrew mccarthy who starred in 1980s teen classics such as "pretty in pink" and "weekend at bernie's." first, you know i had to ask him how he went from actor to world traveler? >> about ten years ago i sort of began this accidental second career as a travel writer. i had been traveling a great deal personally and then i found that none of the travel writing i was reading was capturing the essence of the trips that i was having. so, i just began to write about it. i started writing for magazines and i'm an editor now at "national geographic traveler" and write for other newspapers and magazines and blossomed into this career because i followed a passion, really. >> in your book, you take off from patgonia, which some call the end of the earth. it seems to be part of your personal struggle between commitment to the woman in your life who you refer to in the book as dee and your longing to
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travel alone. what were you seeking on that particular journey and have you reconciled the two? >> yeah, you sort of talk about the essence of the book, how do we come to terms with sort of having our own solitude and our individual ity and commit to intimacy with another person. patgonia, i think, represents for me that sort of ultimate sort of just escape and solitary existence that is something i really gravitate to on one level. >> have you found the balance between having your solitude and, i think you went on to get married, did you not? >> i mean, i did get married, yeah. and did i find the balance? you know, some days. some days i feel i have and other days it's like, get me on a plane. so, i think it's an ongoing process. >> so, has your wife read the book? what does she think of it? >> she was happy with the way it
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ended, which is us getting married. my wife knows who i am and people often ask how does your wife respond to you leaving and i think traveling makes me the better version of who i am and that's the version she wants. i bring back that better version so she's all for it. she also has her own vital life, she's not sitting around, waiting for me. the idea that we should all be together all the time to have a proper relationship is silly. everybody should be pursuing what makes them the best who they are. that's what we want to offer to our loved ones. that's my excuse anyway. >> well, you've been to some extraordinary places. if you had to choose one that was the most memorable, could you? what would it be? >> i took my son to the sahara desert a couple years ago. he is doing a story for a magazine and after we went to the desert for a couple days. i found that a powerful experience. seeing him in the desert and
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exposing him to that kind of environment and experience was a huge thing for me, as well as him. that was very memorable. i loved patgonia i love cities, i love rome. it's usually me. if i don't like something it's me. i need a nap or a good meal and then i'm fine. >> it was great to chat with him. you can read more about andrew's travel in "national geographic traveler magazine." let's check with dr. sanjay gupta md. >> randi, i am looking at the psychology behind mass shootings. what it might be like to be the parent of someone who is mentally ill. i can tell you, it's so hard to get people into treatment. we'll talk about some of those barriers and much more at 7:30 a.m. eastern.
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